The Thoughts of an Educated Young African American Male

Paris Hilton is going to Jail – Now, that’s hot!

Paris is going to jail!Paris Hilton, girls gone wild white girl role model, is going to jail for 45 days. And, she will not be able to get out of this. While she will be seperated from the general population, this will be a harsh punishment for her. Without the drugs she likely uses to survive on a daily basis, I expect her to look similiar to a crack addict when she finishes her sentence. Remember, Joe Francis, Girls Gone Wild Founder, is in deeper trouble for attempting to sneak drugs into jail. They are rich crack addicts. They are not likely on crack, but cocaine, weed, and whatever pills they take make them addicts like all the others.

This is good. She should be punished. She should get in trouble. Hopefully, she will learn a lesson and girls across the nation will see that there is punishment for your actions. If white privilege can’t get her out of this, then it seems like California is serious on cracking down on these fools.

Paris, get ready for the real “Siple Life!”

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May 9, 2007 Posted by | 45 days, court, Girls Gone Wild, jail, Paris Hilton | 5 Comments

The results of being a thug!

Thanks to Afronerd for posting this. I had no idea. Of course, the media will not nationally cover things that may deter the gang culture in our society. I don’t know about the coverage in NY, but down here in NC we heard nothing.

Ronell Wilson, who is a gang member, executed two undercover detectives to boost his street cred and steal a measly few hundred bucks, was convicted of murder by a federal jury – which now must decide if he should be put to death.

Stupidly, he decided to write a rap song about the murders before he was caught. This sounds painfully familiar to these rappers who rap about drugs, guns, and killings. The difference is, they make millions telling lies, this guy may be sentenced to death.

The misspelled, barely intelligible lyrics read: “You better have that vast [vest] and dat Golock [glock]. Leave a 45 slogs [slugs] in da back of ya head. Cause I’m getting dat bread [money], ain’t goin stop to I’m dead.”  

Well, art imitates life because he may be sentenced to death so he will stop shooting people in the back of the head and robbing them afterwards. At some point, we must show our young culture that this type of behavior has consequences.

December 29, 2006 Posted by | African American, Black men, court, detectives, Gangs, gangsta, hip hop, New York, NYPD, rap, Ronell Wilson, undercover | 13 Comments

2 FAMU Kappas convicted for Hazing

Leon County Sheriff’s Deputy Debbie Giangrosso, left, tries to pull a handcuffed Michael Morton away from kissing his fiancee as he and Jason Harris, center, are being led to the Leon County Jail after being found guilty of hazing.This post pains me, mainly because I am a member of a black Greek letter organization founded before 1913, and I understand, while disagreeing, with the hazing culture which it fosters. But, with two of the Kappas getting convicted under
Florida’s new hazing statute, the stakes seem to be higher than normal to haze guys.

I have already commented on my blog before about how stupid I think hazing is. I have standing to say it because I was hazed and am a member of one of these organizations. For those who disagree, I ask, were we founded for the purpose of going to jail for hazing? Were we founded to look more like gangs than non profit organizations for the purpose of service? Are the guys how are going to jail any more “real” for their acts. Truthfully, they are paper, because where they are going they have no credibility. They are not thugs. They were college men attempting to get a good education at a respected HBCU. They are not ready for their possible maximum 5 year sentence.

And, the parents are unsure if they are suing the fraternity civilly. This is sad and should serve as a wake up call, because no black Greek organization can survive a major civil suit for the hazing the majority of us inflict. Just think, to be sure your pledges get the respect; you may be the sole cause for bankrupting and ending your organization. Is that what you want? I doubt that’s what the founders wanted.

December 21, 2006 Posted by | African American, Black men, college, court, FAMU, Gangs, hazing, HBCU, Kappa, Kappa Alpha Psi, university | 7 Comments

Understanding Racial Profiling

The framework of this entry is based in the legal profession which I will be employed shortly. I intern during the year at a local district attorney’s office. There, I interact with roughly 300 or so African Americans per day. I see many African Americans at the trial and punishment phase for the crimes they commit. As such, I have a duty to run their criminal records for sentencing purposes. After performing such searches for over a year, I have become immune to African American mens and women’s records which are 6 – 8 pages long, with conviction after conviction for a multitude of crimes. When they are in court, they dress as they would in their normal life: long white tee shirts; big baggy jeans; long chain around their neck; and a hat if the bailiff did not make them take it off.

 

In undergrad we were required to take a class called psychology. There, we learned the concept of conditioned stimuli. The concepts’ premise is that when you see or hear something repeatedly (the condition) and it is accompanied by a certain result (stimuli) you will eventually expect the result (stimuli) every time you see or hear the condition. The concept is similar to training a dog. If you point your finger down and tell the dog to sit (condition), once the dog knows he will get a treat every time he obeys the command (stimuli), he will do it mostly every time.  

 

When people in court see black men and women dressed a certain way 300 times a day (condition), and run their records half the time, seeing long records of convictions most of the time (stimuli), they become conditioned to believing that most every young black person they see in their personal lives dressed that way has a long record for the crimes like the people we see in court.   

 

Further, there is nothing in these white peoples lives to break the condition. When they go home, they have no reason to interact with blacks who look that way. Of course, they work with other blacks and went to school with many others. But, those blacks seem different and outside the condition. They do not wear their jeans baggy, with a big white tee-shirt, and a straight brimmed hat. Thus, they do not place the blacks they know within the conditioned group. The result is that when you dress a certain way (like anyone in a basic rap video) you will be perceived by these whites to have a long criminal record.  And, I do not condone such stereotyping. However, I must say, I understand where it comes from.

 

Some will say, they don’t know the real me. That is true. But, they do not have to get to know you. They see many blacks on a daily basis, and a person’s record is as much a reflection of their person and character as anything. 6-8 pages of convictions for assaults, larcenies, theft crimes, and violent crimes tells a white person all they need to know. We may not like it, but its real.

 

All of this just to say, we need to break the mold and do better to stop the conditioned stimuli.   

December 3, 2006 Posted by | African American, Black men, Black women, college, court, Law, racial profiling, teens, university | 5 Comments